Thursday, October 29, 2020

The Bishops Have Spoken: Abortion Trumps - Crisis Magazine

The Bishops Have Spoken: Abortion Trumps - Crisis Magazine: The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) has been very clear in its characterization of the most important issue in this election: “The threat of abortion remains our preeminent priority.” Other issues—immigration, racism, poverty and the death penalty—are of great importance and require urgent attention, but even though they are prominent issues, abortion is preeminent among them. …

Xi's Mandate of Heaven: Rewriting the Bible - Crisis Magazine

Xi's Mandate of Heaven: Rewriting the Bible - Crisis Magazine: What do Xi Jinping and Thomas Jefferson have in common? There may be a hundred interesting answers (which you can consider at your leisure), but as yet there is one that is both fairly substantial and sufficiently documented: both men set out to rewrite the Bible. Jefferson’s project—initially undertaken while president of the United States—was …

Wednesday, October 28, 2020

Voting for Abortion is a Crime Against Humanity - Crisis Magazine

Voting for Abortion is a Crime Against Humanity - Crisis Magazine: Abortion is an intrinsic moral evil. It involves carrying out or arranging to carry out the deliberate killing of an innocent human being. An intrinsic evil is an action that is always gravely sinful regardless of the circumstances. There are no exceptions, no grey areas. The U.S. federal government is guilty of and complicit in …

Tuesday, October 27, 2020

Pope Francis to Europe: Be Yourself! Rediscover Your Ideals.. Remain Under the Protection of Your Patron Saints - ZENIT - English

Pope Francis to Europe: Be Yourself! Rediscover Your Ideals.. Remain Under the Protection of Your Patron Saints - ZENIT - English: Francis Sends Letter to Cardinal Parolin on 40th Anniversary of COMECE, 50th anniversary of the establishment of diplomatic relations between Holy See & EU and of Presence of Holy See as Permanent Observer at Council of Europe (Full Text)

Monday, October 19, 2020

Gnawed Off Fingers By Br. Bartholomew Calvano, O.P. on October 19, 2020

Gnawed off fingers. That was the reward Saint Isaac Jogues received for preaching the Gospel. There were other tortures too, but the missing fingers were what really left their mark. They couldn’t be hidden. They weren’t just any fingers either. His thumb and index finger on both hands were either missing or mutilated. You’d be hard-pressed to find worse wounds you could give a priest. At the time, these were the only fingers with which a priest could lawfully touch the Eucharist. That meant that even after escaping his imprisonment he was unable to celebrate Mass. It would be months before he made it back to Europe and received permission to be allowed to hold the Eucharist with his remaining digits, which only the Pope could give. These wounds could reasonably spell the end of a missionary career, but St. Isaac Jogues returned to the New World again to preach the Gospel. He was martyred in 1646, only ten years after he had gone to New France for his first mission. Today we celebrate not only St. Isaac Jogues, but all of the North American Martyrs: eight Jesuits martyred between 1642 and 1649 in New York and Canada. These men believed the Gospel was worth suffering and dying for. They counted the cost they paid as a more than fair exchange to lead men and women into a relationship with Jesus Christ. All of us have heard this same Gospel. Jesus Christ, the only begotten Son of God, became flesh, was born of the Virgin Mary, suffered, died, and on the third day rose from the dead. He then ascended into heaven and is seated at the right hand of the Father. He did this for our sake, so that we might be forgiven of our sins and have eternal life with him. What value do we place on this Gospel? Is it worth a few fingers? Death? Some of us may have received the Gospel at such a price. There are still martyrs today. For many of us, however, we received the Gospel in more peaceful circumstances. Blood wasn’t spilled to preach it to us. The surpassing worth of our faith may be less obvious to us. For this reason, remembering the lives of the saints who poured out their blood for the sake of the Gospel can help enkindle in us a commensurate appreciation for the worth of the Gospel we have heard. Even if we have received the Gospel peaceably, we may not always be able to live out that Gospel faithfully without persecution. The class of persecution we might face is unlikely to be that of gnawed off fingers. The wounds we receive will be less gruesome and more easily hidden. They might be ridicule, mockery, exclusion from social circles, not being promoted at work, not being hired for a job, or abandonment by friends and family. Should such struggles come our way, the example of the saints such as Isaac Jogues and the other North American Martyrs can serve as encouragement that the Gospel really is worth the suffering we endure. ✠Image: St. Isaac Jogues, CC BY-SA 4.0

Sunday, October 18, 2020

CARDINAL MINDSZENTY

https://www.terrorhaza.hu/en/allando-kiallitas/first_floor/cardinal-mindszenty 


According to 1949 census data, 70 percent of the Hungarian population, or about 6.5 million people, were Catholic. Therefore, the Catholic Church had significant social, public and political influence as well as important material resource.  Their education, social, cultural and church institutions covered the entire country. Consequently, the Catholic Church played a major role in the cultivation and observation of national culture and traditions. 

On 7 October 1945, the Holy See placed a charismatic pontiff at the head of the Hungarian Catholic church, József Mindszenty, who said no to both terror and dictatorship.  As the Bishop of Veszprém, he was imprisoned first by the Arrowcross and later by the Communists in 1949. Under the leadership of Archbishop Mindszenty, the Catholic Church roused hundreds of followers to protect church institutions.  Above all, the church protected Catholic schools and protested the compulsory termination of religious education. The Communist ideological performers incited extreme hate against Cardinal Mindszenty and the entire Church. 

Police operations were carried out against church institutions and schools and harassment and intimidation followed. The state took 30 high school students by force from Gyöngyös with their Franciscan teacher, Father Szaléz Kis. They were charged for concealing weapons and accused of being a revolutionary organization. Father Kis, 17 year old Ottó Kizmán and László Bodnár as well as 16 year old Sándor Kiss were convicted and executed in early September 1946. Their classmates were sentenced to prison and forced labor.

In January 1948, Rákosi gave the order that ˝by the end of the year we must end the Church rebellion.˝ The Communists organized a national campaign to nationalize Church-run schools. In Pócspetri, an accidentally discharged rifle led to a tragedy (3 June 1948), when it became a pretext for the Communists to begin a military campaign against the Catholic clergy, the believers within the Hungarian peasantry, and the entire village. János Kádár, Gábor Péter, a representative from the Party newspaper, ˝Free People˝ and Miklós Vásárhelyi went to the site which had been completely occupied by the ÁVO.

The Communists assaulted almost every resident of the village. The entire country resounded with the clerical reaction murdered a policeman.

On 20 June 1948, 6,500 Church-run schools were nationalized. Not long afterwards, the Communists expelled the churches from the health and social care sectors.  With the revoking of operational permits of these now ˝useless˝ religious orders, and the brutal treatment of the monks and nuns, they were able to exercise pressure on the still free leaders of the church. On 26 December 1948, the Communists already arrested and then sentenced to life imprisonment József Mindszenty, Archbishop of Esztergom and head of the Hungarian Catholic Church.

Mindszenty´s trial was held from 3-8 February 1949 at the Budapest Court of the People before Vilmos Olti´s council. The prosecutor was Gyula Alapy. Throughout the entire trial the public opinion was worked and manipulated. The regime tried to convince the frightened country with hundreds of unprecedented press campaigns, protests and demonstrations of Mindszenty´s ˝crimes˝ or in their language: the harmful ˝black reaction˝ and fury against the people.

The conviction of the Archbishop - and the Communists were well aware of this - was by no means enough to induce the total submission of the Roman Catholic Church.  They introduced the concept of ˝clerical reaction˝ as well. Everyone from the Pope to the smallest village parish became a reactionary. The prisons were filled with Catholic priests and the harassment of Catholics became an everyday occurrence. The Catholic Church resisted as long as it could.

Then in summer 1950, after three consecutive events, the church finally recoiled. The Catholic episcopacy came to the realization that the Communists´ cruelty and brutality knew no boundaries. They were shaken by the dismantlement of the religious orders, the deprived and persecuted nuns and monks, the fate of more than 10,000 of their brothers. They were conscious of their powerlessness and defenselessness. They had to fear that the ˝peace priest˝ movement that was forced on to the church by the Communists might lead to a schism inside the church. They were also hopeless because the strong and prestigious Polish episcopacy was coerced into an agreement with the socialist state in Poland. In the ˝agreement˝, the Catholic Bishops agreed to support the state order and government of the Hungarian People´s Republic. In return, the government promised to ensure religious and operational freedom of the church. The church received back eight church-run schools, where they could guarantee a Catholic education run by its own teaching order.

Less than a year later the signatory of the agreement, József Grősz, the Archbishop of Kalocsa, ended up in the crossfire.  József Révai, a member of the Communist party´s highest leadership body, elaborated the conception of a show trial, which was organized in the summer of 1951.  Archbishop Grősz was condemned to 15 years in prison, Ferenc Vezér, a monk from the Order of St. Paul, was sentenced to death,  Father Vendel Endrédy from Zirc received a 14 year prison term and his colleagues were also given serious prison sentences.  The ÁVH demanded that the bishops in Vác, Székesfehérvár and Szeged-Csanád appoint ˝peace priests˝ to important church positions. In July 1951, under the leadership of Archbishop Gyula Czapik of Eger, the free members of the episcopacy pledged their allegiance to the constitution of the Hungarian People´s Republic.

The Communists achieved their goals. The ÁVH terror broke down the resistance of the pontiffs and expanded the party´s scope of power to the church.

In 1956, Archbishop Mindszenty was freed and briefly resumed his leadership of the Church. However, on the day the Soviet attacked to put down the revolution, the Archbishop sought and was granted asylum in the US Embassy on Szabadság square, where he spent  the next 15 years captive. In 1971, under pressure from the Holy See and the Hungarian government, he emigrated.  He lived for another 4 years.  In 1991, his remains were returned to Hungary and buried in the Esztergom Basilica.  His beatification is under consideration by the Holy See. Pope John Paul II´s visit to Hungary in August 1991 symbolized the end of the 40 years of religious persecution.


Thursday, October 15, 2020

Catholics Pray For Protesters Who Knocked Down Statue Of Junipero Serra ...

California Catholics pray, protest at destroyed St. Junipero Serra statue

California Catholics pray, protest at destroyed St. Junipero Serra statue: Catholics in California rallied in a peaceful demonstration Tuesday evening at the former site of a statue of St. Junipero Serra, which a group of activists defaced and pulled down earlier this week.

Rethinking the Enlightenment - Crisis Magazine

Rethinking the Enlightenment - Crisis Magazine: “We are victims of our century,” wrote one of the Carmelites of Compiègne before going to the guillotine in 1794, “and we must sacrifice ourselves that it be reconciled to God.” Attacks on Catholic churches, anti-Christian elites, and suffocating political correctness—the eighteenth century witnessed cultural conflict every bit as intense as our own today. Yet …

Wednesday, October 14, 2020

Hawley vs. the Know-Nothings - Crisis Magazine

Hawley vs. the Know-Nothings - Crisis Magazine: At last. On the first day of Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Republican senators stood up to the anti-religious bigotry of their Democratic colleagues over the disgraceful treatment of Judge Barrett’s Catholic faith. One of the greatest highlights was Senator Josh Hawley’s impassioned opening statement against the blatant anti-Catholic bigotry …

Thursday, October 8, 2020

Democrats Are the New Know-Nothings - Crisis Magazine

Democrats Are the New Know-Nothings - Crisis Magazine: With the nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court, Catholics should buckle their chinstraps for the torrential cascade of anti-Catholicism that will be belched up by her opponents. The vituperative attacks on Catholics will probably rival the Know-Nothing riots that rocked the nation in the 1840s and 1850s. But this time, there …

Wednesday, October 7, 2020

The Box: in it or Out of it

                                                                    The Oldest Camera (In Italian Camera = Room)



                                                       Old RCA_630-TS_Television


                                                                     Newer TV's 



                                                                Older Computer



                                                                Older smart phones



                                                            Surveillance Cameras


                                             Big Brother has been watching us and still is

                                     Don't Panic, Repent and Reconcile with The Holy Church


                                                  Tabernacle Saint George Catholic Church, 

St Edith Stein: "The parables present the divine truth in a locked box, as it were. Often it is left to us to look for the key."



Sunday, October 4, 2020

The whole see of Denmark is a Prison as it is all Nations-Digital Prisons-"We are all just prisoners here, of our own device"

        "We are all just prisoners here, of our own device"



                                                     Old School

                                                 Radio Towers

                                        Radio Networks across usa


                                       Radio Towers in Canada


                                         Microwave Towers


                                                 TV Towers to  Your Home


                                     Rock Stations Network across usa



                                             Cell phone Towers


                                             Verizon-data-map
   

                                        The electronic noose tightens 



                                       The Digital prison in the air


Future is now







Escape from the Rock Alcatraz Island

In Denmark, punishment is not about the place,’ he explains. ‘It is about the lack of freedom.’ 

The inevitable implication of course is that the whole state of Denmark has been corrupted by the king's bad habits and vicious nature, until "the dram of eale, Doth all the noble substance of a doubt To his own scandal." (I. iv. 36-8.) This condition of corruption impresses both Hamlet and his friends almost from the outset.

At the same time, Hamlet gives the impression of being the only one who seems to feel imprisoned by Claudius's rule:

"Why, then, ’tis none to you, for there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so. To me it is a prison." (act 2 scene 2)

It's not surprising that Rosencrantz, for example, doesn't feel the same way about Denmark (or England) as Hamlet. After all, pursuing the prison metaphor further, he's one of the jailers. Or, at the very least, he's a spy sent by Claudius to keep a close eye on Hamlet. In any case, Hamlet seems to be the only one resisting his uncle's morally corrupt tyranny. That, more than anything else, makes him feel like he's in prison. Shakespeare chose Denmark as the setting for Hamlet because he likely knew about the castle in Helsingør, which translates to the English spelling Elsinore. 


                                              Saying it in Song



Radioactive


Whoa, oh, oh
Whoa, oh, oh
Whoa, oh, oh
Whoa

I'm waking up to ash and dust
I wipe my brow and I sweat my rust
I'm breathing in the chemicals
[Inhale, exhale]

I'm breaking in, shaping up, then checking out on the prison bus
This is it, the apocalypse
Whoa oh

I'm waking up, I feel it in my bones
Enough to make my system blow
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I'm radioactive, radioactive
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I'm radioactive, radioactive

I raise my flag and dye my clothes
It's a revolution, I suppose
We're painted red to fit right in
Whoa oh

I'm breaking in, shaping up, then checking out on the prison bus
This is it, the apocalypse
Whoa oh

I'm waking up, I feel it in my bones
Enough to make my system blow
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I'm radioactive, radioactive
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I'm radioactive, radioactive

All systems go, the sun hasn't died
Deep in my bones, straight from inside

I'm waking up, I feel it in my bones
Enough to make my system blow
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Welcome to the new age, to the new age
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I'm radioactive, radioactive
Whoa, oh, oh, oh, oh, whoa, oh, oh, oh, I'm radioactive, radioactive


"Hotel California" 
On a dark desert highway, cool wind in my hair
Warm smell of colitas, rising up through the air
Up ahead in the distance, I saw a shimmering light
My head grew heavy and my sight grew dim
I had to stop for the night
There she stood in the doorway
I heard the mission bell
And I was thinking to myself" This could be Heaven or this could be Hell"
Then she lit up a candle and she showed me the way
There were voices down the corridor
I thought I heard them say
Welcome to the Hotel California Such a lovely place (Such a lovely place) Such a lovely face Plenty of room at the Hotel California Any time of year (Any time of year) You can find it here Her mind is Tiffany-twisted, she got the Mercedes bends She got a lot of pretty, pretty boys she calls friends
How they dance in the courtyard, sweet summer sweat Some dance to remember, some dance to forget So I called up the Captain" Please bring me my wine." 
He said, "We haven't had that spirit here since nineteen sixty nine." And still those voices are calling from far away Wake you up in the middle of the night Just to hear them say 
Welcome to the Hotel California 
Such a lovely place (Such a lovely place) Such a lovely face They livin' it up at the Hotel California What a nice surprise (what a nice surprise) Bring your alibis Mirrors on the ceiling The pink champagne on ice And she said "We are all just prisoners here, of our own device" And in the master's chambers They gathered for the feast They stab it with their steely knives But they just can't kill the beast
Last thing I remember I was running for the door I had to find the passage back to the place I was before "Relax," said the night man "We are programmed to receive You can check-out any time you like
But you can never leave!"


Radar love 
I've been driving all night, my hands wet on the wheel There's a voice in my head that drives my heel

It's my baby calling, says "I need you here" And it's a half past four and I'm shifting gear 

When she is lonely and the longing gets too much
She sends a cable coming in from above


Don't need no phone at all 

We've got a thing that's called radar love
We've got a wave in the air Radar love

The radio is playing some forgotten song
Brenda Lee's "Comin' on Strong"

The road has got me hypnotized 

And I'm speeding into a new sunrise
When I get lonely and I'm sure I've had enough
She sends her comfort coming in from above 

We don't need no letter at all
We've got a thing that's called radar love
We've got a line in the sky 

Radar love
No more speed, I'm almost there
Gotta keep cool now, gotta take care
Last car to pass, here I go 

And the line of cars goes down real slow
And the radio played that forgotten song
Brenda Lee's "Coming On Strong"

And the newsman sang his same song

Oh, one more radar lover gone
When I get lonely and I'm sure I've had enough
She sends her comfort coming in from above
We don't need no letter at all
We've got a thing that's called radar love
We've got a line in the sky
We've got a thing that's called radar love

We've got a thing that's called
Radar love





Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree

 


The Chest nut tree café, the place where one is sent to commiserate with the others who have been trough the process and room 101. There they sit and wait to be shot.


Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree

Under the spreading chestnut tree

I sold you, and you sold me

There lie they, and here lie we,

Under the spreading chestnut tree.

 

I've never been alone

it's a comfort to know

leaves a chill in my bones.

The written word is a lie

and our children are spies

yet I don't want to die.

Proof lies in the words that I write

but if I were to fight

would it be worth my life?

They sing what ever they choose

only birds and proles do

why should I not sing to?

what have I to lose?

unless their price is you.

 

Under the spreading chestnut tree

I sold you, and you sold me.

There lie they and here lie we.

Under the spreading chestnut tree.

 

You are a risk I will take

for every law I can break

proves I am their mistake.

Beaten and broken apart

it's a science, an art

but they can't break my heart.

We will do whatever they ask

staying out of their grasp

was an impossible task.

Their wrong outweighs their right

but how can I fight,

when they threaten my life?

Two and two equal five.

In the place full of light.

 

Under the spreading chestnut tree

I sold you, and you sold me.

There lie they, and here lie we.

Under the spreading chestnut tree.

 

I sit and waste away

in the corner cafe

as a song starts to play.

I stare into the eyes so stern

and as the bullet enters

I will live, I have learned.

 

Under the spreading chestnut tree

I sold you, and you sold me.

There lie they and here lie we,

Under the spreading chestnut tree.

https://youtu.be/Ul9jbIP_93g


REPENT AND RECONCILE WITH HOLY CHURCH 

ASAP

Under the Spreading Chestnut Tree (2)

Friday, October 2, 2020

Chess -Life or Death Struggle

 


 It has been said that Chess is a lot like real life. A life or death struggle. If that be so, we must know a bit about the pieces and the moves. The white King ( life) can only move one space at a time, while the white Queen can move any number of spaces, The black King (death)  and Queen the same moves..

White always has the first move.