Friday, May 22, 2020

Reflections on the Protestant Revolution - Crisis Magazine

Reflections on the Protestant Revolution - Crisis Magazine: According to one sage observation: he who gets to name names, wins. Why do we talk about the Protestant Reformation and not the Protestant Revolution, for example? After all, Martin Luther commenced his journey as a reformer, repulsed righteously, as most of us would be, by the corruption and decadence of the Rome of his …

Next Time, There Will Be No Excuses - Crisis Magazine

Next Time, There Will Be No Excuses - Crisis Magazine: It’s beginning to look as though the pandemic that has hit the world like a global tsunami might be finally waning. In its wake, we find ourselves picking up the pieces of broken religious practices following an unprecedented time in history in which the faithful were deprived of the sacraments through the orders of their …

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

Rome: The Eternal City

Movies about Rome

1. La Dolce Vita won the Palme d'Or (Golden Palm) at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival and the Oscar for Best Costumes. The film was a worldwide box-office success and a critical success, and is now frequently regarded as one of the greatest films in world cinema.

La Dolce Vita 1960 • Final Scene • ( English Subs )

https://youtu.be/pIkFea5aO1g


2. La Strada, Regarded by some as Federico Fellini's finest work and the winner of the first Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film, La ..
https://youtu.be/o10y_MZ_geM


3. Marcello Mastroianni plays Guido Anselmi, a director whose new project is collapsing around him, along with his life. One of the ...

Mr. Confederate Man - Rebel Son (with lyrics)

The Rebel Soldier

The Rebel Soldier

Confederate Soldier Song "Johnny Reb" Johnny Horton

Thursday, May 14, 2020

MAY 14: Pope Reminds Religions Today Unite in Prayer & Fasting for End to Pandemic

MAY 14: Pope Reminds Religions Today Unite in Prayer & Fasting for End to Pandemic (FULL HOMILY)

‘This Is Not Religious Relativism,’ Pope Francis Adamantly Reaffirms
Today, May 14th, religions across the world are invited to unite in prayer and fasting for an end to the pandemic…
Pope Francis reminded faithful of this today during his private daily Mass, streamed from his residence Casa Santa Marta, reported Vatican News, stressing we are, no matter our religious affiliation, brothers and sisters.
“Today, the Higher Committee for Human Fraternity,” Francis reminded, “has called for a day of prayer and fasting to ask the merciful God for an end to this tragic moment of the pandemic.”
“We are all brothers and sisters,” he continued, reminding: “St Francis of Assisi used to say: “All brothers and sisters”. And so, men and women of every religious confession are uniting themselves today in prayer and penance to ask for the grace of healing from this pandemic.”
In his homily, the Holy Father reflected on the example of the prophet Jonah.
“The city of Nineveh,” he recalled, “was afflicted by some sort of pandemic – perhaps by a moral pandemic – and was about to be destroyed. God called Jonah to preach a message of prayer, penance, and fasting.”
Jonah, the Pope said, was initially overcome by fear and so ran away from his mission, but then God called him again, and the prophet went to Nineveh to preach.
People of all faiths and traditions, the Holy Father repeated, are called to pray and fast together for delivery from the pandemic, as the people of Nineveh did in response to Jonah’s preaching.
He acknowledged that none of us expected the coronavirus pandemic, but that it is upon us, and “many people are dying, many of them alone.”
Francis also cautioned those who have not been affected by the pandemic not to rejoice.
“Often,” the Argentinian Pope recognized, “the thought can arise: ‘Well, at least I haven’t been affected. Thank God I’m safe.’
“But,” he appealed, “think about others. Think about the tragedy and its consequences on the economy and education. Think about what will come afterwards.”
This selfish attitude, he expressed, we try to overcome with today’s prayers.
Praying together, the Pope adamantly stressed, is in no way “religious relativism.”
“How can we not,” he asked, “pray to the Father of all?”
“Everyone,” the Pope acknowledged, “prays as they know how, as they can, according to what they have received from their culture.”
Stressing “we aren’t praying against each other,” he said, “we are united in humanity as brothers and sisters.”
The Holy Father urged everyone to ask God for forgiveness of our sins, so that “God might put an end to this pandemic.”
Many other pandemics, the Pope said, afflict humanity.
Over 3.7 million people, the Pope said citing official statistics, died from hunger in the first four months of the year.
“This day of prayer against the pandemic,” he urged, “must make us think also of many other pandemics. The pandemics of war, of hunger.”
The people of Nineveh, the Pope said, listened to the prophet and converted from their evil ways. God saw their conversion and stopped the pandemic.
“May God,” he said, “put an end to this tragedy – this pandemic – and have mercy on us.
“And may He put an end to the other terrible pandemics of hunger, war, and uneducated children. This we ask as brothers and sisters, all together.
Pope Francis concluded, praying: “May God bless us all, and have mercy on us.”
The Masses in Francis’ chapel normally welcome a small group of faithful, but due to recent measures’ taken by the Vatican, are now being kept private, without their participation. The Holy Week and Easter celebrations in the Vatican were also done without the presence of faithful, but were able to be watched via streaming.
The Masses at Santa Marta will stop being streamed as of Monday, May 18th.
It was announced at the start of the lockdowns in Italy that the Pope would have these Masses, in this period, be available to all the world’s faithful, via streaming on Vatican Media, on weekdays, at 7 am Rome time, along with his weekly Angelus and General Audiences.
On May 4th, the country entered its so-called ‘Phase 2′, where it will slowly relaxing some of the lockdown restrictions.
Public Masses in Italy with the faithful will resume on Monday, May 18th, according to a statement of the Italian Bishops’ Conference. There will continue to be various safety measures in place, in order to protect the faithful.
In Italy where more than 30,000 people have died from COVID19, public Masses are still prohibited. To date, in the Vatican, there have been twelve cases of coronavirus in the Vatican, confirmed a recent statement from the Director of the Holy See Press Office, Matteo Bruni.
The Vatican Museums are closed, along with the Vatican’s other similar museums. There have also been various guidelines implemented throughout the Vatican, to prevent the spread of the virus.
For anyone interested, the Pope’s Masses at Santa Marta can be watched live and can be watched afterward on Vatican YouTube. Below is a link to today’s Mass. Also, a ZENIT English translation of the Pope’s full homily is published below.
-------------------

FULL HOMILY  [working translation by ZENIT’s Virginia Forrester]
In the First Reading we heard the story of Jonah, in a style of the time. Since, we don’t know, there was “some pandemic” in the city of Nineveh, a “moral pandemic, perhaps, [the city] was about to be destroyed (Cf. Jonah 3:1-10). And God sends Jonah to preach: prayer and penance, prayer and fasting (Cf. vv. 7-8). In face of that pandemic, Jonah got scared and fled (Cf. Jonah 1:1-3). Then the Lord called him a second time and he agreed to go and preach this (Cf. Jonah 3:1-2). And today all of us, brothers and sisters of all religious traditions, pray. <It is> a <Global> Day of Prayer and Fasting, of Penance, proclaimed by the Higher Committee of Human Fraternity. Each one of us prays, communities pray, Religious Confessions pray, they pray to God: all brothers, united in fraternity, which brings us together in this moment of sorrow and tragedy.
We weren’t expecting this pandemic. It came without our expecting it, but now it exists. And so many people are dying. So many people are dying alone and so many people are dying without being able to do anything. The thought can often come: “It doesn’t touch me; thank God, I’ve been spared.” But think of others! Think of the tragedy and also of the economic consequences, the consequences on education, the consequences . . .  what will happen after. And, therefore, today all brothers and sisters, of whatever Religious Confession, pray to God. Perhaps there’ll be someone who’ll say: “This is religious relativism and it can’t be done.” But why can’t it be done to pray to the Father of all? Each one prays as he knows how, as he can, as he has received from his culture. We are not praying against one another, this religious Tradition against that <other>, no! We are all united as human beings, as brothers, praying to God according to our own culture, according to our own Tradition, according to our own beliefs, but as brothers praying to God <and> this is important! Brothers, fasting, asking God’s pardon for our sins, so that the Lord will have mercy on us, so that the Lord will forgive us, so that the Lord will stop this pandemic. Today is a day of fraternity, looking to the one Father, brothers and paternity — Day of Prayer.
Last year, in fact in November of last year, we didn’t know what a pandemic was: it came as a deluge, it cam suddenly. Now we are waking up a bit. However, there are so many other pandemics that make people die and we don’t realize it, we look elsewhere. We are somewhat unaware in face of the tragedies that are happening in the world at this time. I only want to mention to you an official statistic of the first four months of this year, which does not refer to the coronavirus pandemic but another. In the first four months of this year, 3.7 million people died of hunger. There is the pandemic of hunger. In four months, almost four million people <died>. Today’s prayer to ask the Lord to stop this pandemic, must  make us think of the other pandemics in the world. There are so many — the pandemic of war, of hunger, and so many others! However, what is important is that today — together and thanks to the courage that the Higher Committee of Human Fraternity had – we were invited to pray, each one according to his own Tradition and to observe a day of penance and fasting and also of charity, of help to others. This is what is important. We heard in the Book of Jonah that the Lord — when He saw how the people reacted, who converted, the Lord halted, He halted what He wanted to do.
May God stop this tragedy, may He stop this pandemic. May God have mercy on us and also halt the many other awful pandemics: that of hunger, of war, of children without education. And we ask this as brothers, all together. May God bless us all and have mercy on us all.
The Pope Invited the Faithful to Make a Spiritual Communion, with this Prayer:
My Jesus, I believe You are really present in the Most Holy Sacrament of the altar. I love You above all things and I desire You in my soul. . As I cannot now receive You sacramentally, come at least spiritually into my heart. As if You have already come, I embrace You and unite myself wholly to You. Do not permit me to be ever separated from You.
Pope Francis ended the celebration with Eucharistic Adoration and Benediction. At the end of the Mass, the Pope thanked Tommaso Pallottino, the sound technician of the Dicastery for Communication, who accompanied him in these live broadcasts and today was his last day of work before his retirement. “May the Lord bless him and accompany him in the new stage of life,” prayed Pope Francis.
Before leaving the Chapel, dedicated to the Holy Spirit, the Marian antiphon Regina Caeli” was intoned, sung in Eastertide:
Regina caeli laetare, alleluia.
Quia quem meruisti portare, alleluia.
Resurrexit sicut dixit, alleluia.
Ora pro nobis Deum, alleluia.
(Queen of Heaven, rejoice, alleluia.
Christ, whom you bore in your womb, alleluia,
Is Risen as He promised, alleluia.
Pray for us to the Lord, alleluia).

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Pope’s Morning Homily: Abiding in Jesus, Enables Us to Bear Unimaginable Fruit May 13

Pope’s Morning Homily: Abiding in Jesus, Enables Us to Bear Unimaginable Fruit (FULL TEXT)

Amid Coronavirus Pandemic, Pope Francis Prays for Students & Teachers
When we abide in Jesus, He enables us to do more than we could ever imagine…
Today, May 13th, the Feast Day of Our Lady of Fatima, Pope Francis gave this powerful reminder during his private daily Mass, streamed from his residence Casa Santa Marta, reported Vatican News.
At the start of the Mass during this global coronavirus pandemic, Pope Francis prayed specifically for students and teachers.
“May the Lord,” he prayed, “help them on this path and grant them courage and success.”
In his homily, the Holy Father reflected on today’s Gospel, according to St. John (Jn 15:1-8), in which Jesus says to his disciples: ‘I am the true vine and my Father is the vine grower. He takes away every branch in me that does not bear fruit, and everyone that does he prunes so that it bears more fruit.’
The Pontiff went on to reflect on how important it is, that we remain always in Jesus.
“It will do us good to think and reflect on this: to abide in Jesus; and Jesus abides in us,” he said.
“To abide in Jesus,” the Holy Father elaborated, “is to have the lymph, the strength, to have justification, gratuitousness for having fecundity. And He abides in us to give us the strength to [bear] fruit (Cf. John 5:15), to give us the strength to witness with which the Church grows.”
He then encouraged faithful to ask themselves the following: “how is the relationship between Jesus, who abides in me, and me, who abide in Him?”
“It’s a relationship of intimacy, a mystical relationship, a relationship without words. “But Father, let the mystics do this!” No, this is for all of us, with little thoughts: “Lord, I know that You are there: give me the strength and I will do what You’ll say to me. But I must abide in Him . . .”
Pope Francis concluded, praying: “May the Lord help us to understand and feel this mysticism of “remaining”: of the branches that need to remain on the vine, and the vine that needs the branches to bear the fruit of testimony.”
The Masses in Francis’ chapel normally welcome a small group of faithful, but due to recent measures’ taken by the Vatican, are now being kept private, without their participation. The Holy Week and Easter celebrations in the Vatican were also done without the presence of faithful, but were able to be watched via streaming.
The Masses at Santa Marta will stop being streamed as of Monday, May 18th.
It was announced at the start of the lockdowns in Italy that the Pope would have these Masses, in this period, be available to all the world’s faithful, via streaming on Vatican Media, on weekdays, at 7 am Rome time, along with his weekly Angelus and General Audiences.
On May 4th, the country entered its so-called ‘Phase 2′, where it will slowly relaxing some of the lockdown restrictions.
Public Masses in Italy with the faithful will resume on Monday, May 18th, according to a statement of the Italian Bishops’ Conference. There will continue to be various safety measures in place, in order to protect the faithful.
In Italy where more than 30,000 people have died from COVID19, public Masses are still prohibited. To date, in the Vatican, there have been twelve cases of coronavirus in the Vatican, confirmed a recent statement from the Director of the Holy See Press Office, Matteo Bruni.
The Vatican Museums are closed, along with the Vatican’s other similar museums. There have also been various guidelines implemented throughout the Vatican, to prevent the spread of the virus.
For anyone interested, the Pope’s Masses at Santa Marta can be watched live and can be watched afterward on Vatican YouTube. Below is a link to today’s Mass. Also, a ZENIT English translation of the Pope’s full homily is published below.
***
FULL HOMILY  [working translation by ZENIT’s Virginia Forrester]
The Lord returns to His “abide in Me,” and says to us: “Christian life is to abide in Me” — to abide (Cf. John 15:1-8). And He uses here the image of the vine, as the branches abide in the vine. And this abiding isn’t a passive abiding, a falling asleep in the Lord: this would be, perhaps, a “beatific sleep,” but it isn’t this. This abiding is an active abiding; it’s also a mutual abiding, why? Because He says: “Abide in Me, and I in you” (v. 4). He also abides in us, not only we in Him. It’s a mutual abiding. In another part He says: My Father and I “will come to him and make our home with him” (John 14:23). This is a mystery, but it’s a mystery of life, a most beautiful mystery is this mutual abiding. Also with the example of the branches: it’s true, without the vine the branches can do nothing because the lymph doesn’t flow; they need lymph to grow and bear fruit. However, the tree, the vine needs the branches, because fruits aren’t attached to the tree, to the vine. It’s a mutual need; it’s a mutual abiding to bear fruit.
And this is the Christian life: it’s true that Christian life is to obey the Commandments (Cf. Exodus 20:1-11); this must be done. Christian life is to follow the way of the Beatitudes (Cf. Matthew 5:1-13); this must be done. Christian life is to carry out works of mercy, as the Lord teaches us in the Gospel (Cf. Matthew 25:35-36), and this must be done. But, it’s more: it is this mutual abiding. Without Jesus, we can do nothing, as the branches without the vine. And He — may the Lord permit me to say it — seems unable to do anything without us, because the branch bears the fruit, not the tree, not the vine. In this community, in this intimacy of “fruitful abiding,” the Father and Jesus abide in me and I abide in Them.
There comes to mind, what is the “need” that the vine’s tree has of the branches? It’s to have fruits. What is the “need” — let’s say it thus, with a little daring — what is the “need” that Jesus has of us? Witness. When He says in the Gospel that we are light — He says: “Let your light so shine before men, that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in Heaven” (Matthew 5:16), that is, witness is the need that Jesus has of us. To give witness of His name, because faith, the Gospel grows through witness.
This is a mysterious way: Jesus glorified in Haven, after having gone through the Passion, is in need of our witness to make grow, to proclaim, for the Church to grow. And this is the mutual mystery of “abiding.” He, the Father and the Spirit abide in us, and we abide in Jesus.
It will do us good to think and reflect on this: to abide in Jesus; and Jesus abides in us. To abide in Jesus is to have the lymph, the strength, to have justification, gratuitousness for having fecundity. And He abides in us to give us the strength to [bear] fruit (Cf. John 5:15), to give us the strength to witness with which the Church grows. And I ask myself the question: how is the relationship between Jesus, who abides in me, and me, who abide in Him? It’s a relationship of intimacy, a mystical relationship, a relationship without words. “But Father, let the mystics do this!” No, this is for all of us, with little thoughts: “Lord, I know that You are there: give me the strength and I will do what You’ll say to me. But I must abide in Them . . .
May the Lord help us to understand, to feel this mysticism of abiding on which Jesus insists so much, so much, so much. Often, when we speak of the vine and the branches, we stop at the figure, at the profession of the farmer, of the Father: that [branch] that bears fruit he cuts, namely, he prunes, and what he doesn’t prune he cuts and throws away (Cf. John 15:1-2). It’s true, He does this, but it isn’t all, no. There is something more; this is help: the trials, the difficulties of life, also the correction that the Lord does to us. However, let us not stop there. Between the vine and the branches there is this intimate abiding. We, the branches, are in need of the lymph, and the vine needs the fruits of witness.
The Pope Invited the Faithful to Make a Spiritual Communion with this Prayer:
My Jesus, I believe that You are really present in the Most Holy Sacrament of the altar. I love You above all things and I desire You in my soul. As I cannot now receive You sacramentally, come at least spiritually into my heart. As if You have already come, I embrace You and unite myself wholly to You. Do not permit me to be ever separated from You.
Pope Francis ended the celebration with Eucharistic Adoration and Benediction. Finally, on the occasion of today’s Memorial two stanzas of the Hail Mary of Fatima were intoned:
On the thirteenth of May
Mary appeared
To three little shepherds
In Cova d’Iria.
Hail, hail, hail Mary,
O beautiful Queen
Who reign in Heaven
Italy bows to You
Invokes You, faithfully.

Tuesday, May 12, 2020

During Morning Mass, Pope Praises Heroism of Nurses (FULL TEXT) May 12

During Morning Mass, Pope Praises Heroism of Nurses (FULL TEXT)

Pope Francis Distinguishes Between Jesus’ and Worldly Peace
Pope Francis has praised the heroism of nurses.
This International Nurses Day, May 12th, Pope Francis did so during his private daily Mass, streamed from his residence Casa Santa Marta, reported Vatican News.
At the start of the Mass during this global coronavirus pandemic, Pope Francis prayed specifically for nurses, underscoring that more than just a profession, being a nurse “is a vocation.”
Nursing, he reminded, is a calling that, especially in this time of pandemic, is marked by heroism – even to the point of giving one’s life.
In his homily, the Holy Father reflected on today’s Gospel, according to St John: “Peace I leave you; my peace I give you” (Jn 14:27), before distinguishing the peace the world gives and the peace given by Jesus gives.
This peace, the Pontiff underscored, is not “universal peace,” coming from the absence of war, but a “peace in the heart, peace in our souls, the peace we all have within.”
Jesus says in today’s Gospel, that his peace is not that of the world.
The world’s peace, the Argentine Pontiff observed, is that given by “the things that are superficially pleasing to me,” and is a “personal possession, something I have in isolation from others, something I keep for myself alone”.
Without realizing it, Francis suggested, this kind of peace can lull us into a sleepy tranquility, where we end up closed in on ourselves.
“It’s a bit selfish,” Pope Francis said.
Moreover, he said it’s also a “costly” peace, because those who seek it must always change what gives them that peace. “It is costly because it is temporary and sterile”.
Jesus’ peace, on the other hand, the Pope distinguished is rather different.
The Lord’s peace, he said, “makes you move. It doesn’t isolate you.”
The peace Jesus gives, he continued, leads you to reach out to others, “to create community and communication.”
While the peace the world gives exacts a huge toll, the peace Jesus gives is entirely free, a gift of the Lord.
Worldly peace, the Pontiff underscored, “doesn’t open the doors to the future, to heaven”, the Pope said, but is concerned only with oneself.
The peace Jesus gives, on the other hand, is always focused on the Lord.
It is a peace not just for today, but for the future: “It is to begin to live in heaven, with the fruitfulness of heaven.”
“Worldly peace,” Pope Francis observed, “can lull us to sleep like a drug… but we are constantly in need of another ‘dose.’ This worldly peace is limited, because it is always temporary; but the peace that Jesus gives, is definitive, fruitful, and infectious.”
Pope Francis concluded, praying: “May the Lord grant us this peace that gives hope, that creates community, and that looks to the definitive peace of paradise.”
The Masses in Francis’ chapel normally welcome a small group of faithful, but due to recent measures’ taken by the Vatican, are now being kept private, without their participation. The Holy Week and Easter celebrations in the Vatican were also done without the presence of faithful, but were able to be watched via streaming.
It was announced at the start of the lockdowns in Italy that the Pope would have these Masses, in this period, be available to all the world’s faithful, via streaming on Vatican Media, on weekdays, at 7 am Rome time, along with his weekly Angelus and General Audiences.
On May 4th, the country entered its so-called ‘Phase 2′, where it will slowly relaxing some of the lockdown restrictions.
Public Masses in Italy with the faithful will resume on Monday, May 18th, according to a statement of the Italian Bishops’ Conference. There will continue to be various safety measures in place, in order to protect the faithful.
In Italy where more than 30,000 people have died from COVID19, public Masses are still prohibited. To date, in the Vatican, there have been twelve cases of coronavirus in the Vatican, confirmed a recent statement from the Director of the Holy See Press Office, Matteo Bruni.
The Vatican Museums are closed, along with the Vatican’s other similar museums. There have also been various guidelines implemented throughout the Vatican, to prevent the spread of the virus.
For anyone interested, the Pope’s Masses at Santa Marta can be watched live and can be watched afterward on Vatican YouTube. Below is a link to today’s Mass. Also, a ZENIT English translation of the Pope’s full homily is published below.
***
FULL HOMILY  [working translation by ZENIT’s Virginia Forrester] –
Before taking His leave, the Lord greeted His own and gave <them> the gift of peace (Cf. John 14:27-31), the Lord’s peace: “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you; not as the world gives do I give to you” (v. 27). It’s not about universal peace, that peace without wars, which we would always like to be, but peace of heart, peace of soul, the peace that each one of us has within us. And the Lord gives it, but He stresses: “not as the world gives it” (v. 27). How does the world give peace and how does the Lord give peace? Are they different peaces? Yes. The world gives you “interior peace,” we are talking about this, the peace of your life, your living with your “heart in peace.” It gives you interior peace as a possession of yours, as something that is yours and isolates you from others, it keeps you in yourself; it’s an acquisition of yours: I have peace. And, without realizing it, you shut yourself in that peace, it’s a peace that is a little for you, for one, for each one; it’s a peace alone, it’s a peace that makes you calm, also happy. And in this tranquillity, in this happiness you fall asleep a little, it anesthetizes you and makes you stay with yourself in a certain tranquillity. It’s somewhat selfish: peace for me; closed in me. That’s how the world gives it (Cf. v. 27). It’s a costly peace because you must continually change the “instruments of peace”: when something enthuses you, when something gives you peace, then it ends and you must find another . . . It is costly because it’s provisional and sterile.
Instead, the peace that Jesus gives is something else. It’s a peace that puts you in movement: it doesn’t isolate you, it puts you in movement, it makes you go to others, it creates community, it creates communication. That of the world is costly; that of Jesus is free, it’s gratis; it’s a gift of the Lord: the Lord’s peace. It’s fruitful; it always takes you forward. An example of the Gospel that makes me think how the peace of the world is, is that of the man who had his barns full and the harvest that year seemed to be plentiful and he thought: “But I will have to build larger barns, other granaries to store this and then I’ll be tranquil . . . it’s my tranquillity, with this I can live calmly.” “Fool,” says God, “you will die this night” (Cf. Luke 12:13-21). It’s an immanent peace, which doesn’t open the door of the beyond to you. Instead, the Lord’s peace is open, wherever He went, it’s open to Heaven, it’s open to Paradise.
I think it will help us to think a little: what is my peace; where do I find peace? In things, in wellbeing, in trips — but now, today one can’t travel — in possessions, in many things, or do I find peace as gift of the Lord? Do I have to pay for peace or do I receive it gratis from the Lord? How is my peace? Do I get angry when I lack something? This isn’t the Lord’s peace. This is one of the tests. Am I tranquil in my peace? Do I “fall asleep”? <If so>, it’s not of the Lord. Am I in peace and want to communicate it to others and take something forward? That’s the Lord’s peace! Does that peace stay with me also in awful, difficult moments? <Then> it’s of the Lord. And the Lord’s peace is fruitful for me too because it’s full of hope, namely, it looks to Heaven.
Yesterday — I’m sorry if I say these things but they are things of life that do me good — yesterday I received a letter from a priest, a very good, good priest, and he said to me that I speak little of Heaven, that I should speak more of it. And he’s right; he’s right. Therefore today I wish to stress this: that peace, this that Jesus gives us, is a peace for now and for the future. It’s to begin to live Heaven, with the fruitfulness of Heaven. It’s not anesthesia. The other is: you anesthetize yourself with the things of the world and when the dose of this anesthesia finishes, you take another, and another and another . . . <The Lord’s> is a definitive, fruitful and also infectious peace. It’s not narcissistic, because it always looks to the Lord. The other looks at you, it’s somewhat narcissistic.
May the Lord give us this peace full of hope, which makes us fruitful, which makes us communicative with others, which creates community and which always looks at the definitive peace of Paradise.
Pope Francis ended the celebration with Eucharistic Adoration and Benediction. Before leaving the Chapel, dedicated to the Holy Spirit, the Marian antiphon Regina Caeli” was intoned, sung in Eastertide:
Regina caeli laetare, alleluia.
Quia quem meruisti portare, alleluia.
Resurrexit sicut dixit, alleluia.
Ora pro nobis Deum, alleluia.

(Queen of Heaven, rejoice, alleluia.
Christ, whom you bore in your womb, alleluia,
Is Risen as He promised, alleluia.
Pray for us to the Lord, alleluia).

The Martyr's Wife (Film Clip) England, Mary's Dowry

Monday, May 11, 2020

Our Help in Everyday Decision Making? The Holy Spirit (Full Text of Pope’s Morning Homily) Pope Francis Prays for Those Who Lost Work or Lack Work May 11

Our Help in Everyday Decision Making? The Holy Spirit (Full Text of Pope’s Morning Homily)

Pope Francis Prays for Those Who Lost Work or Lack Work
Everyone needs a bit of help when making decisions, whether big or small…  When uncertain what to do, the Holy Spirit, Pope Francis says, is our helper, leading us in the right direction.
According to Vatican News, today, May 11th, the Pontiff expressed this during his private daily Mass at his residence Casa Santa Marta.
At the start of the Mass, Pope Francis prayed for all victims of Coronavirus, and specifically for those who have lost their jobs or lack work.
“In these days,” Francis said, “many people have lost their jobs,” noting many “have not been re-employed, or are working ‘under the table.'”
“We pray for these brothers and sisters of ours who are suffering because of lack of work,” he said.
In his homily, the Holy Father reflected on today’s Gospel according to St. John (Jn 14:21-26), observing it is the ‘Farewell Discourse’ after the Last Supper in which Jesus reassures His disciples and tells them they will never be left alone.
“Whoever loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him. Whoever does not love me does not keep my words; yet the word you hear is not mine but that of the Father who sent me. I have told you this while I am with you. The Advocate, the Holy Spirit whom the Father will send in my name he will teach you everything and remind you of all that I told you.”
God, Pope Francis underscored, sent the Holy Spirit to accompany and sustain us throughout our lives, noting the Spirit ‘never leaves us alone.’
The Holy Spirit, the Jesuit Pope reminded, “is called the Paraclete – or the Advocate – because He sustains us, He accompanies us so we do not fall,” and explained that “the Lord has promised us this support, who is God.”
“What does the Holy Spirit do in us?” he asked, noting “he teaches us to enter into the mystery of faith, he helps us to understand the mystery, the doctrine of Jesus and to develop our faith without making mistakes.”
Doctrine, Francis also added, “grows in understanding but always in the same direction.”
The Spirit, the Pope underscored, teaches us to grow, to discern, and to remember.
The Spirit, he also said, brings us to the memory of salvation, the memory of the journey of life. He guides us to discern what we must do now, what is the right way and what is the wrong way.”
This gift of God of the Holy Spirit, Francis suggested, “helps us to make everyday decisions, big and small.”
“He teaches us everything, He introduces us into mystery, He makes us remember, discern and grow,” he said.
Pope Francis concluded, praying: “May the Lord help us to keep this gift that we received in Baptism.”
The Masses in Francis’ chapel normally welcome a small group of faithful, but due to recent measures’ taken by the Vatican, are now being kept private, without their participation. The Holy Week and Easter celebrations in the Vatican were also done without the presence of faithful, but were able to be watched via streaming.
It was announced at the start of the lockdowns in Italy that the Pope would have these Masses, in this period, be available to all the world’s faithful, via streaming on Vatican Media, on weekdays, at 7 am Rome time, along with his weekly Angelus and General Audiences.
On May 4th, the country entered its so-called ‘Phase 2′, where it will slowly relaxing some of the lockdown restrictions.
Public Masses in Italy with the faithful will resume on Monday, May 18th, according to a statement of the Italian Bishops’ Conference. There will continue to be various safety measures in place, in order to protect the faithful.
In Italy where more than 30,000 people have died from COVID19, public Masses are still prohibited. To date, in the Vatican, there have been twelve cases of coronavirus in the Vatican, confirmed a recent statement from the Director of the Holy See Press Office, Matteo Bruni.
The Vatican Museums are closed, along with the Vatican’s other similar museums. There have also been various guidelines implemented throughout the Vatican, to prevent the spread of the virus.
For anyone interested, the Pope’s Masses at Santa Marta can be watched live and can be watched afterward on Vatican YouTube. Below is a link to today’s Mass. Also, a ZENIT English translation of the Pope’s full homily is published below.
***
FULL HOMILY  [working translation by ZENIT’s Virginia Forrester] –
The passage of today’s Gospel is Jesus’ taking leave at the <last> Supper (Cf. John 14:21-26). The Lord ends with these verses: “These things I have spoken to you, while I am still with you. But the Counselor, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, He will teach you all things, and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you” (vv. 25-26). It’s the promise of the Holy Spirit, the Spirit that dwells <in> us and that the Father and Son send. Whom “the Father will send in my name,” says Jesus, to accompany us in life. And we call Him Paraclete. This is the office of the Holy Spirit. In Greek, the Paraclete is He who supports one. And the Lord promised us this support that is God as He <is>: it is the Holy Spirit. What does the Holy Spirit do in us? The Lord tells us: “He will teach you all things and bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you” (v. 26). To teach and to recall: this is the office of the Holy Spirit. He teaches us; He teaches us the mystery of the faith; He teaches us to enter in the mystery, and understand the mystery a bit more. He teaches us Jesus’ doctrine and He teaches us how to develop our faith without erring, because the doctrine grows, but always in the same direction: it grows in understanding. And the Spirit helps us to grow in understanding of the faith, to understand it more, to understand what the faith says. Faith isn’t something static; doctrine isn’t something static, it grows. It grows as trees grow, always the same but larger, with fruit, but always the same, in the same direction. And the Holy Spirit avoids the doctrine erring; it avoids it remaining still there, without growing in us. He will teach us what Jesus has taught us, He will develop in us understanding of what Jesus has taught us, He will make the Lord’s doctrine grow in us to maturity.
And another thing that Jesus says the Holy Spirit does is to recall: He “will bring to your remembrance all that I have said to you” (v. 26). The Holy Spirit is like the memory, He awakens us: ”But remember this, remember that.” He keeps us awake, always awake in the things of the Lord and He also makes us remember our life. “Think of that moment, think when you encountered the Lord; think when you left the Lord.” I once heard that a person was praying before the Lord thus: “Lord, I am the same as I was as a child, as a boy, I had these dreams. Then I went on erroneous ways. Now You have called me.” I am the same: this is the memory of the Holy Spirit in one’s life. He leads one to the memory of salvation, to the memory of what Jesus has taught, but also to the memory of one’s own life. And this made me think — what this gentleman was saying — of a good way of praying, of looking at the Lord: “I am the same. I have walked so much, I have made many mistakes, but I am the same and You love me.” The memory of <our> way of life, and the Holy Spirit guides us in this memory: He guides us to discern; to discern what I must do now, what the right way is and what the mistaken way is, also in small decisions. If we ask the Holy Spirit for light, He will help us to discern to make true decisions, the every day small ones and the bigger ones. He is the one that accompanies us; He sustains us in discernment. That is, the Spirit that teaches, that will teach us everything, namely, that makes <our> faith grow, that introduces us in the mystery, the Spirit that reminds us. He recalls the faith, He recalls our life, and it’s the Spirit that in this teaching, in this remembrance, teaches us to discern the decisions we must make. And to this the Gospels give a name to the Holy Spirit: yes, Paraclete, because He supports us, but <He has> another more beautiful name: He is the Gift of God. The Spirit is the Gift of God. The Spirit is in fact the Gift. I will not leave you alone. I will send a Paraclete that will support you and help you to go forward, to remember, to discern and to grow. The Holy Spirit is the Gift of God.
May the Lord help us to guard this Gift that he gave us in Baptism and that we all have within.
The Pope invited the faithful to Make a Spiritual Communion with This Prayer:
My Jesus, I believe You are really present in the Most Holy Sacrament of the Altar. I love You above all things and I desire You in my soul. As I cannot now receive You sacramentally, come at least spiritually into my heart. As if You have already come, I embrace You and unite myself wholly to You. Do not permit me to be ever separated from You.
Pope Francis ended the celebration with Eucharistic Adoration and Benediction. Before leaving the Chapel, dedicated to the Holy Spirit, the Marian antiphon “Regina Caeli” was intoned, sung in Eastertide:

Regina caeli laetare, alleluia.
Quia quem meruisti portare, alleluia.
Resurrexist sicut dixit, alleluia.
Ora pro nobis Deum, alleluia.

(Queen of Heaven, rejoice, alleluia.
Christ, whom you bore in your womb, alleluia,
Is Risen, as He promised, alleluia.
Pray for us to the Lord, alleluia).

About Deborah Castellano Lubov

Pope at Mass prays for those who have lost their jobs May 11

Pope at Mass prays for those who have lost their jobs

Pope Francis turns his thoughts during morning Mass to those who are suffering because they have lost their jobs due to the pandemic and reflects on how God has sent the Holy Spirit to accompany and sustain us throughout our lives.
By Linda Bordoni
Pope Francis presided over Mass at the Casa Santa Marta on the Monday of the Fifth Week of Easter. During his introduction he said that at this time his thoughts go to the unemployed.
“In these days many people have lost their jobs”, the Pope said, many have not been re-employed, or are  working "under the table." 
“We pray for these brothers and sisters of ours who are suffering because of lack of work,” he said.
During the homily, the Pope commented on today's Gospel (Jn 14:21-26). He said it is the ‘Farewell Discourse’ after the Last Supper in which Jesus reassures His disciples and tells them they will never be left alone.
“Whoever loves me will keep my word, and my Father will love him, and we will come to him and make our dwelling with him. Whoever does not love me does not keep my words; yet the word you hear is not mine but that of the Father who sent me. I have told you this while I am with you. The Advocate, the Holy Spirit whom the Father will send in my name he will teach you everything and remind you of all that I told you.”
Pope Francis explained this is the promise of the Holy Spirit who dwells with us, and whom the Father and the Son have sent to accompany us in life.
The Holy Spirit never leaves us alone
He said the Holy Spirit “is called the Paraclete – or the Advocate – because He sustains us, He accompanies us so we do not fall,” and explained that “the Lord has promised us this support, who is God.”
“What does the Holy Spirit do in us?” he asked.
The Spirit, he said, teaches us to enter into the mystery of faith, he helps us to understand the mystery, the doctrine of Jesus and to develop our faith without making mistakes.
He went on to explain that doctrine, in fact, “grows in understanding but always in the same direction,” and that the Spirit helps us to understand the mystery more and more.
The Spirit teaches us to grow, to discern, to remember
Our understanding of the mystery “grows as the trees grow: they are always the same but larger, and taller and with more fruit, but at the same time, they are always the same,” he said.
And doctrine, the Pope continued, is not static but grows, noting that it is the Spirit who prevents doctrine from remaining static, and develops in us the understanding of what Jesus taught us.
The Spirit, he continued, also makes us remember what Jesus told us, “He is like memory, He awakens us, He awakens us in the things of the Lord, He helps us remember our own lives,” when we met or left the Lord.
And developing this theme further, Pope Francis said “He brings us to the memory of salvation, the memory of the journey of life. He guides us to discern what we must do now, what is the right way and what is the wrong way.”
The Holy Spirit is the Gift of God
“The Holy Spirit guides us along this path in which there is memory,” he said.
“He helps us to make everyday decisions, big and small. He teaches us everything, He introduces us into mystery, He makes us remember, discern and grow,” he said.
The Pope concluded reassuring the faithful that the Spirit is the “Gift of God” as is proclaimed in the reading from John: "I will not leave you alone, I will send you a Paraclete who will never leave you alone and who will help you discern and grow.”
“May the Lord,” he prayed, “help us to keep this gift that we received in baptism.”

Sunday, May 10, 2020

Santa Marta Saturday: Pope Offers Mass for Daughters of Charity of St. Paul-The Holy Spirit Makes the Church Grow May 9

Santa Marta Saturday: Pope Offers Mass for Daughters of Charity of St. Paul

The Holy Spirit Makes the Church Grow
Pope Francis on May 9, 2020, offered his Saturday Mass for the Daughters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul who help the Pope and live in the Casa Santa Marta. In his homily, he said the Holy Spirit makes the Church grow, while the evil spirit tries to destroy it with envy, power, and money, according to the report published in Vatican News.
In his homily, the Pope recalled the memorial of Saint Luisa de Marillac, who co-founded the Daughters of Charity with Saint Vincent de Paul. A community of the nuns lives in the Casa Santa Marta, and run the pediatric dispensary in the Vatican.  Her feast day was earlier on March 15 but since it fell during Lent, it was moved to May 9 in 2016.
A  painting of the foundress was placed at the side of the altar in the chapel for her feast.
“Today is the commemoration of Saint Luisa de Marillac,” the Pope said at the start of the Mass.  “Let us pray for the Vincentian sisters who have been running this clinic, this hospital, for almost 100 years and have worked here, in Santa Marta, for this hospital. May the Lord bless the sisters,” he said.
In his homily, Pope Francis commented on the passage from the Acts of the Apostles (Acts 13:44-52) where the Jews of Antioch “filled with jealousy and with violent abuse” contradicted Paul’s statements about Jesus. They incited the pious noblewomen and the famous people of the city, provoking persecution that forced Paul and Barnabas to leave the territory.
Speaking about the power of God, the Pope recalled the Responsorial Psalm, “Sing to the Lord a new song, for He has done wondrous deeds; His right hand has won victory for Him, His holy arm. The Lord has made His salvation known…”
In the Acts of the Apostles, the Pope noted, the whole city of Antioch gathered to listen to the Word of the Lord, because Paul and the Apostles preached boldly, and the Spirit helped them. But seeing the multitude, the Jews were filled with jealousy and opposed Paul’s preaching with insults.

On the one hand,” the Pope noted, “there is the Holy Spirit who makes the Church grow. On the other hand, there is the evil spirit that tries to destroy the Church.”
It has always been this way – one goes ahead but the enemy comes to destroy.  
He said there are many difficulties and martyrdom in this growth, in this struggle. As the Word of God makes the Church grow, persecution often arises.
“The Church,” the Pope pointed out, “strives ahead between the consolations of God and the persecutions of the world”.  And when the Church “has no difficulties there is something missing”. He added: “If the devil is calm, things are not going well.”
The Pope said the instrument that the devil uses to destroy the proclamation of the Gospel is envy and jealousy. It is the devil’s anger that destroys.
Witnessing this struggle, the Pope said, it is good to realize that the Church goes ahead between the consolation of God and the persecution of the world.
There is always this struggle – the Holy Spirit creates harmony in the Church and the evil spirit destroys, even today.
Temporal powers, the Pope pointed out, are an instrument of this envy. “Temporal power can be good, people can be good but, in and of itself, power is always dangerous.”
“The power of the world is opposed to the power of God, and behind the power of this world lies money.”
The Pope said that ever since the morning of the Resurrection, temporal power and money have been used to silence the truth.
The Holy Father concluded saying that a Christian should place his or her trust in Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit, and not in temporal power and money.
The Masses in Francis’ chapel normally welcome a small group of faithful, but due to recent measures’ taken by the Vatican, are now being kept private, without their participation. The Holy Week and Easter celebrations in the Vatican were also done without the presence of faithful, but were able to be watched via streaming.
It was announced at the start of the lockdowns in Italy that the Pope would have these Masses, in this period, be available to all the world’s faithful, via streaming on Vatican Media, on weekdays, at 7 am Rome time, along with his weekly Angelus and General Audiences.
On May 4th, the country entered its so-called ‘Phase 2′, where it will slowly relaxing some of the lockdown restrictions.
Public Masses in Italy with the faithful will resume on Monday, May 18th, according to a statement of the Italian Bishops’ Conference. There will continue to be various safety measures in place, in order to protect the faithful.
In Italy where nearly 30,000 people have died from COVID19, public Masses are still prohibited. To date, in the Vatican, there have been twelve cases of coronavirus in the Vatican, confirmed a recent statement from the Director of the Holy See Press Office, Matteo Bruni.
The Vatican Museums are closed, along with the Vatican’s other similar museums. There have also been various guidelines implemented throughout the Vatican, to prevent the spread of the virus.

Santa Marta Sunday: Pope Prays for European Unity--Bishops Called to Pray and Proclaim the Word

Santa Marta Sunday: Pope Prays for European Unity

Bishops Called to Pray and Proclaim the Word
Pope Francis began Sunday morning Mass at the Casa Santa Marta recalling two anniversaries that have fallen in the past two days, reported Vatican News.
The first, “the 70th anniversary of Robert Shuman’s Declaration out of which the European Union was born”, and the second, “the commemoration of the end of the war”. He invited us to “pray to the Lord for Europe that it might grow united, in this fraternal unity that allows all peoples to grow in unity in diversity”.
During his homily, Vatican News said, he reflected on Jesus’s intercessory role before His Father described in the Gospel (John 14:1-12). Then he focused on Peter’s description of the role of the Apostles (Acts 6:1-7). This also applies to the role of the Successors of the Apostles, the Bishops. Their first task, Pope Francis emphasized, is prayer, then the proclamation of the Word.
The Pope said that the first part of John chapter 14 describes Jesus’s intercessory role before the Father on our behalf. So many times Jesus spoke about the Father’s care for us, Pope Francis said. “He spoke of the Father as the One who takes care of us just as He takes care of the birds of heaven and the lilies of the field”, he said. Jesus is very strong in this passage. It is as if He is opening the doors of the omnipotence of prayer: ‘Whatever you ask in my name, I will do, so that the Father may be glorified in the Son. If you ask anything of me in my name, I will do it’ (John 13-14).”
Pope Francis then recalled that prayer requires courage and the same boldness needed in preaching the Gospel. Abraham and Moses provide examples to us. Both “negotiated” with the Lord, Pope Francis said: Abraham, when the Lord told him about what was to happen to Sodom and Gomorrah (see Genesis 18:16-33), and Moses, when God wanted to destroy His people and make Moses the head of another nation (see Exodus 32:7-14).
The Pope then turned to the First Reading in which Peter is inspired to create a new service in the Church after the Greek-speaking converts complained that their widows were being neglected. “The apostles didn’t have time for all of these things and Peter, enlightened by the Holy Spirit, ‘invents’ (we can say it this way) the deacons”, Pope Francis said.
This resolved the situation, the Pope went on. The people in need could be well taken care of and the Apostles, as Peter said, could devote themselves “to prayer and to the proclamation of the Word”.
Pope Francis then went on to develop the thought that the primary task of a bishop is to pray. The bishop, he said, “is the first to go to the Father, with the confidence, the boldness, with which Jesus went in order to fight on behalf of his people”.
“Something is not right”, Pope Francis continued, “if other things take away space for prayer”. He reminded us that it is “God who does things, we do very little. God does things in His Church”. It is, therefore, “prayer that makes the Church progress”.
This reality is so because Jesus stands before the Father and has promised that “whatever you ask in my name, I will do, so that the Father may be glorified”.
The Pope concluded his homily saying that the “Church progresses in this courageous prayer because she knows that without this ascension to the Father, she cannot survive”.