Friday, May 8, 2020

It's still a numbers game. Arabic vs Roman Image=Petrus_Astronomus_Astronomical_clock_in_Uppsala_Cathedral.



It's still a numbers game. Arabic vs Roman Image=Petrus_Astronomus_Astronomical_clock_in_Uppsala_Cathedral.



-Uppsala_cathedral Originally built under Roman Catholicism, it was used for coronations of Swedish monarchs for a lengthy period following the Protestant Reformation.


It's still a numbers game. Arabic vs Roman Image=Petrus_Astronomus_Astronomical_clock_in_Uppsala_Cathedral.

-Uppsala_cathedral Originally built under Roman Catholicism, it was used for coronations of Swedish monarchs for a lengthy period following the Protestant Reformation.

"Arabic numerals" in Europe and the Americas is that they were introduced to Europe in the 10th century by Arabic-speakers of North Africa, who were then using the digits from Libya to Morocco.

Arabs were also using the Eastern Arabic numerals (٠١٢٣٤٥٦٧٨٩) in other areas.The European acceptance of the numerals was accelerated by the invention of the printing press, and they became widely known during the 15th century.

Early evidence of their use in Britain includes: an equal hour horary quadrant from 1396,[26] in England, a 1445 inscription on the tower of Heathfield Church, Sussex; a 1448 inscription on a wooden lych-gate of Bray Church, Berkshire; and a 1487 inscription on the belfry door at Piddletrenthide church, Dorset; and in Scotland a 1470 inscription on the tomb of the first Earl of Huntly in Elgin Cathedral. (See G.F. Hill,

The Development of Arabic Numerals in Europe for more examples.) In central Europe, the King of Hungary Ladislaus the Posthumous, started the use of Arabic numerals, which appear for the first time in a royal document of 1456.[27] By the mid-16th century, they were in common use in most of Europe.[28] Roman numerals remained in use mostly for the notation of anno Domini years, and for numbers on clockfaces.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_numerals

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